Blood clotting and bleeding disorders treated by our specialists include:

  • Immune thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Hypercoagulable disorders
  • Hemophilia and other bleeding disorders

Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a condition that affects the blood's ability to clot. This is because the number of platelets (thrombocytes) in the blood is low. Platelets play an important role in helping blood to clot and stop bleeding.

There are two kinds of immune thrombocytopenic purpura:

  1. Acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura, which usually occurs in children after a virus, and generally goes away on its own after about six months.
  2. Chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura, which usually occurs in adults, and lasts more than six months.

The common symptoms of ITP include:

  • Bruising
  • Cuts not clotting after an extended period of time
  • Nosebleeds
  • Bloody gums
  • Bloody urine or bowel movements
  • Tiny, flat blood spots under the skin

Diagnosis and Treatment
When a patient presents with symptoms that may suggest immune thrombocytopenic purpura, your doctor will use several diagnostic methods to make an accurate diagnosis.

Treatment of ITP depends on the number and severity of symptoms. In some cases, no treatment may be necessary beyond careful monitoring of platelet levels in the blood. In other cases, medication may be necessary. In rare cases, it may be necessary to remove the spleen, the organ in the body whose job is to clean blood.

Hypercoagulable Disorders

A hypercoagulable disorder is a condition that increases the risk of having the blood clot. In a healthy body, when a blood vessel is damaged, it begins to leak blood. A cell called a platelet forms a loose plug at the site of the leak to stop the bleeding. Coagulation factors form at the site of the platelet plug to make it strong enough to stop bleeding until the leak is healed.

Once the healing is complete, the body breaks down the clot and takes it away. In patients with hypercoagulable disorders, there is a problem in the system that forms the plugs. Because of this plugs can form when they are not needed and can block healthy blood vessels.

Symptoms of hypercoagulable disorders include:

  • Deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the veins of the lower leg)
    • Pain where clot has occurred
    • Swelling where clot has occurred
  • Heart attack or stroke
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Blood clots in unusual places

Diagnosis and Treatment
When a patient presents with symptoms that may suggest a hypercoagulable disorder, your doctor will use several diagnostic methods to make an accurate diagnosis.

Hypercoagulable disorders are usually treated with a course of anticoagulation medications. The combination of medications prescribed depends on the cause of the hypercoagulation, as well as other factors.

Hemophilia and Other Bleeding Disorders

Hemophilia and other bleeding disorders are caused when the blood is not able to clot stop bleeding as quickly as it should. The body has several different clotting factors which help the blood make a plug to stop bleeding. There are many types of hemophilia, each caused when a specific clotting factor is not able to do its job.

If the amount of clotting factor that is affected is very low, spontaneous bleeding could occur. If the amount of clotting factor that is affected is low to medium, heavy bleeding could occur only after surgery or injury.

Common symptoms of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders include:

  • Spontaneous bleeding
    • Lots of deep or big bruises
    • Unexplained bruising or bleeding
    • Unexplained nosebleeds
    • Blood in urine or bowel movements
    • Swelling and pain in joints (caused by internal bleeding)
    • Feeling tightness in joints
    • Bleeding for a long time from cuts, after surgery or having a tooth out
  • Sudden swelling, pain and warmth in shoulders, elbows, hips or knees
  • Sudden swelling, pain and warmth in arm and leg muscles
  • Very painful headache that lasts a long time
  • Double vision
  • Vomiting
  • Easily exhaustible
  • Neck pain

Diagnosis and Treatment
Hemophilia and other bleeding disorders are diagnosed by looking at the clotting factors present in a blood sample, taken in a blood test. Analyzing the sample can determine if a clotting factor is affected, and if so, which one.

The treatment of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders depends on the type and severity of the hemophilia or bleeding disorder. In some mild cases, a hormone injection can help the body make more the necessary clotting factors. In more serious cases, an infusion of clotting factor, usually from donated blood, is necessary to stop bleeding. Regular, preventative infusions of clotting factor may also be needed.

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844-333-DOCS.


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