Know your heart-healthy numbers – including CRP

“Know your numbers.” It’s a common theme surrounding heart health. Most doctors agree you should know your blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol so you can make changes to improve your health and reduce your risk of heart problems.

But there’s one more number people should be aware of: C-reactive protein (CRP).

CRP is a marker for inflammation in the body. It’s been shown that, when used in conjunction with cholesterol levels, it can help us better understand a person’s risk for heart disease. In fact, one analysis showed that the risk of a future heart event was more than 50 percent higher when CRP levels were over 3 mg/L.

Unfortunately, people often emphasize their cholesterol levels without considering any other factors. They think if their cholesterol is low, they are at low risk for heart disease. That may not always be the case. Knowing both your CRP and cholesterol levels is more powerful than knowing one alone.

Let’s take a closer look at how your CRP affects your heart risk. That way, the next time your doctor prepares to test your cholesterol, you can also ask about your CRP level.

What is CRP, and what does it tell us about heart health?

CRP is a ring-shaped protein produced in the liver in response to inflammation in the body. Inflammation is part of the body’s response to fighting infection. We all have a low level of inflammation at any given time. That’s normal and healthy.

While the exact role inflammation plays in heart disease is a topic of ongoing research, we do know that having a high level of inflammation over a long period of time creates heart risk. And we know we can measure inflammation in the body by testing CRP levels.

Checking your CRP involves a simple blood test. If you’re getting your cholesterol tested, we can use the same tube of blood. No extra needle sticks are necessary.

Your CRP level puts you in one of three categories:

  • Low risk: Less than 1 mg/L
  • Average risk: 1 to 3 mg/L
  • High risk: Greater than 3 mg/L

However, your CRP can’t tell us everything. It’s important to look at it in relation to your cholesterol, specifically low-density lipoprotein (LDL). LDL is considered the bad cholesterol because it collects in your arteries and can cause blockages. Your CRP modifies your LDL level.

Here’s how it works: If you have a low LDL but a high CRP, the high CRP reduces the benefit of a low LDL. You’re at increased risk. And it’s the same in reverse: If you have a high LDL but a very low CRP, that low CRP reduces the risk from the high LDL.

In fact, the American Heart Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say it’s reasonable to measure CRP as a part of heart disease risk assessment. It’s not considered mandatory, but patients and their doctors should discuss its potential benefits.

Once you know your numbers, there is a very simple online scoring tool you can use to predict your heart risk over the next 10 years.

How can you lower your CRP?

What causes a high CRP? It’s a combination of genetics, health and lifestyle factors, including:

  • Chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriasis and gum disease
  • Excess body fat
  • Low physical activity
  • Smoking

The good news is that there are many ways to lower your CRP. Most are the same things you should be doing to live a heart-healthy lifestyle: eat a healthy diet, exercise and quit smoking. If you have a chronic inflammatory condition, work with your doctor to manage it effectively.

Studies, including one I authored, have shown statins also can reduce CRP. Statins are a class of drugs typically prescribed to lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Current guidelines advise the use of statins for people with:

  • Known heart disease
  • Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • An estimated 10-year risk of a heart event greater than 7.5 percent

And the JUPITER study showed statins could benefit otherwise healthy people with high CRP levels by cutting their risk of heart disease and death from heart disease by almost half. This would indicate we should take CRP into effect when assessing a person’s heart risk.

Who should get their CRP tested?

I recommend anyone who has their cholesterol checked to also have their CRP tested. As I said earlier, we can use the same blood draw; we simply check one more box for the lab to test.

Just like with cholesterol, the earlier we identify a high CRP levels, the more time we have to prevent potential heart problems through lifestyle changes and, if necessary, medical treatments.

CRP is simply one more way to optimize our understanding of someone’s heart risk. And high CRP is treatable! So the next time you’re in the doctor’s office, ask about your numbers. All of them.

Request an appointment to test your heart-health numbers.

29 Things You Should Do for a Healthy Heart

You’re heard it many times before -- follow a healthy lifestyle for a healthy heart. Sounds simple, right?  But it’s not always so easy to pull off. A heart healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk for heart disease by as much as 80%!  But what is a “heart healthy lifestyle”?  It’s a commitment to many habits in our daily lives centered on our activity, diets, mindset and awareness.  There is no one “magic” thing. When lifestyle isn’t enough, talk with your doctor to set goals you can realistically achieve, such as losing weight or lowering your cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Sometimes, it takes medications that can be very helpful to optimizing your heart risk.

So, commit to making the many small lifestyle changes that make a healthy heart a snap! The key to success is to make small changes in many areas. No matter what you do, remember to take it day by day, and work to sustain your gains.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled 29 heart health tips. Knowledge is power!  Read on to find out what you can do to keep your heart healthy. Only you can love your heart. So start today!

1. Make time for exercise: Exercising 30 to 60 minutes on most days will cut your heart risk in half.

2. Know your heart disease risk: Calculate your risk by plugging your numbers into an online calculator.

3. Never ignore your chest pain:  Pain can be felt anywhere in the chest area, arms, your back and neck.

4. Check your blood pressure: Let the healthy blood pressure number be below 140/90. Both numbers matter!

5. No smoking: Don’t smoke, and ask your loved ones to quit.

6. Aspirin: Should you take aspirin? If you have heart disease, yes! If you don’t have heart disease, then maybe not! Ask your doctor.

7. Moderate exercise: How do you know whether you are exercising moderately? You should able to carry on a light conversation

8. Stress: Is it bad for your heart? Yes, sustained stress is, no matter the source. Learn to control your stress to prevent heart disease.

9. Second hand smoke is dangerous! Public smoking bans in the community have reduced heart attack risk by 20%.

10. Sex: Is your heart healthy enough for sex? Sex has a “heart workload” like climbing two flights of stairs.

11. Dark chocolate: Give your loved ones chocolate as a gift on Valentine’s day! Regular chocolate eaters have less heart and stroke risk!

12. Order wine with your dinner! Moderate intake is associated with lower heart risk. (Consume wisely!)

13. Red or white wine? Is one better for your heart? Wine, beer or spirits all show a similar relationship to lower heart risk.

14. The “Mediterranean diet” is the most heart healthy way to eat. Studies show this diet reduces heart attack risk up to 30%.

15. Mediterranean diet = veggies, fruits, nuts, seeds, grains, herbs, spices, fish, seafood, olive oil, poultry, eggs, cheese, yogurt and wine.

16. Take your heart meds fully and faithfully! It’s the only way to get the full benefit of the treatments!

17. Stairs burn twice as many calories as walking. Regular stair climbing reduces your risk of premature death by 15%!

18. The quantified self. Keep moving! Steps per day: Very active >10,000, active >7500, sedentary <5000.

19. Fish eaters have less heart disease! Think about fish as a first choice when eating out- let somebody else do the cooking!

20. Did you know that people who are optimistic have less heart disease? See the bright side- it is truly good for your heart!

21. If you snore, tell your doctor. Snoring can be treated, and could signal risks for your blood pressure and heart rhythm.

22. Want to really know your risk of heart attack? Get a calcium scan of your heart. Accurate, safe, and costs less than dinner for 2!

23. Do you know CPR? Simple! Learn it here and double somebody’s chance of surviving cardiac arrest. http://www.cpr.heart.org

24. Ditch the soda and energy drinks. Please.

25. Coffee lover? For your heart’s sake, it is OK! (But, skip the donut!)

26. Like music? So does your heart! Music listening lowers your heart rate, and blood pressure!

27. Are statin cholesterol drugs safe? For most patients, yes! Unfortunately, over the counter supplements aren’t very helpful.

28. Heart attack or stroke symptoms? Don’t delay! Call 911 immediately. Minutes matter to save lives!

29. Taking vitamins or other supplements for heart disease risk? Be careful- few have little, if any, proven benefit.

Have any questions?

We are here to help! Contact us for more information about heart health or to schedule an appointment. Call us at 202-877-3627.

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